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“Registration Proclamation” Chinese Domain Scam!

It's been known for a very long time that the world isn't exactly the safest place; it only makes the internet even more dangerous. If you own a website you'll be bombarded with spam, unsolicited `business' requests and who knows what else. One possible venture for the evil script kiddies is to try to steal your domain and/or personal information. There are many MANY ways to go about doing both, though today I'm going to highlight one possible one for you here. It starts of rather innocently, yet urgently (kind of like the nigerian money scams). You receive an e-mail stating that someone in Asia (in China usually) has tried to register domains which are very similar to yours. Being the wonderful angel corporation that they are, they have noticed that YOUR site just happens be `seem' like it's your brand and would like to make sure. By contacting them within seven (7) days they can make sure that the domains stay with you and your brand. Very interesting … interesting indeed. I say so because:

  1. I couldn't care less about cheap asian domains which have nothing to do with my market since we already have the important ones.
  2. It's a very templated e-mail.
  3. They used annoy big bold red letters.
  4. Did I mention I'm NOT in asia and (currently) don't care about the asian market?
  5. Funny … I got a very similar e-mail only a month before for another domain of mine. Guess what, nothing happened to my hearty domain (and brand).
  6. I REALLY dislike unsolicited things
  7. I'm more paranoid about security and identity theft than a Canadian squirrel right before winter worrying about it's nuts. So what does this message look like? We got on for Chykalophia.com and she was a bit worried about it. Mostly because China happens to be a stone's throw away from her.
> From: “bob”
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> Date: January 17, 2011 9:07:49 PM SST
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> Subject: Registration Proclamation 2011.1.17
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> Reply-To: bob@dis-network.org.cn
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> (This is very urgent, Please forward this to your CEO.)
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> Dear CEO,
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> We are the department of Asian Domain registration service in Hefei, China, have something to confirm with you. We formally received an application on January 17, 2011. one company which self-styled “Hu's Bro & Co” were applying to register “chykalophia” as Network Brand and following domain names: chykalophia.asia
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> chykalophia.cn
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> chykalophia.co.in
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> chykalophia.com.cn
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> chykalophia.com.tw
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> chykalophia.hk
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> chykalophia.in
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> chykalophia.net.cn
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> chykalophia.org.cn
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> chykalophia.tw After our initial checking, we found the brand name were similar to your company's, so we need to check with you whether your company has authorized that company to register these names. If you authorized this, we will finish the registration at once. If you did not authorize, please let us know within 7 workdays, so that we will handle this issue better. Out of the time limit we will unconditionally finish the registration for “Hu's Bro & Co”.
>

>
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> Best Regards, Bob Chen   Auditing Department Tel: (+86) 551-5223174 || Fax: (+86) 551-5223175 Address: 10/F,Jindi International Building,No.588 
>

>
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> MaAnshan South Road,Baohe District,Heifei.China.
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>

Using the simple theory of:

**research of possible business deal so that you don't end up sleeping with the devil by accident… **I tossed in a few searched into google and found some interesting things. And by `interesting' I do mean bad.

  • dis-network.org.cn is blacklisted on several major lists. Also has a VERY bag MyWot rating.
  • An abundance of ‘chinese domain scam' articles, posts and stuff in the search engines which relate to this company.
  • … you get the picture. One very interesting article on the idea of Chinese domain scams is

The e-mail came from someone named Tina (tina@domainnamesasia.com), with no last name given, nor any company listed, just a postal address in NanTong City, which I later discovered is about 65 miles northwest of Shanghai, China. As the owner of the trademark for Learn the Net, I e-mailed Tina that the name is protected under U.S. and international law and that they should not allow John Wang to register the name. Tina replied: “You would know domain name takes open registration, this is international domain name registration principle. So Mr. John Wang has right to register it. If you think his registration will confuse your clients and harm your profits, we can send an application document to you and help you register these domains within our approving period. This is a better way to prevent domain name dispute.” Of course Tina is wrong about “domain name takes open registration”. Under the protocol established by ICANN, the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, the organization that approves Internet registrars, if a registrar knows that the registrant of a domain name is infringing on a trademark, it should deny the request. (More on this in a moment.) In fact “Tina” had acknowledged the infringement in her initial e-mail. At this point, I got suspicious. I know that to register a .cn domain suffix, the Chinese government requires that you have a branch office in China or be a wholly owned subsidiary of a Chinese company. I went to the company website to see what I could learn about them. The website says that “NanTong WiFi Network Technology Co.,Ltd is one of the largest and professional Internet consultant for oversea companies, which authorized by ShangHai Industry and Commerce Bureau and China government.” While there are lots of official looking logos on the site, they are just links to organizations like ICANN, not endorsements. WF.Network’s web address, www.domainnamesasia.com is suspiciously similar towww.domainnameasia.com, owned by BrightDomain, a legitimate web hosting and domain name registrar. But unlike BrightDomain, there is no way to register online, the standard way to do business with a registrar. I e-mailed Tina inquiring if her company was certified by ICANN. She answered, “Yes, our company an ICANN authorized registrar.” ICAAN lists approved registrars, but you won’t be surprised to learn that NanTong WiFi Network isn’t on it.Read the article! It's rather interesting on the subject. Which the author of that article is dealing with “Domain Name Asia .com”, the idea is still exactly the same for the e-mail I got.

In conclusion: STAY AWAY. 99% of the time NO ONE is trying to register your domain. These companies are just trying to get you to pay up for THEIR own service. While not technically a scam, it is VERY underhanded especially when they lie 100% of the time. Again: Stay far far away from these people. If you got an e-mail like that. Like us know!

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  • theresa says:

    received the same email today… thanks

  • C Chau says:

    Do not respond in any way to mails such as or similar to these.
    It’s smart that they didn’t mention money on the 1st email.
    After receiving all those SPAM emails from Nigeria asking for bank a/c info, this sounds pretty legit. But his email is .com and his website is .org
    How could a BIG domain registration service company so inconsistent?

    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    Steven steven@tsnet-china.com
    Dear President,

    We are the department of Asian Domain Registration Service in China. Here I have something to confirm with you. We formally received an application on June 8, 2012 that a company claimed Derst investment, Inc were applying to register “xxxxxxxxx” as their Net Brand and some domain names through our firm.
    Now we are handling this registration, and after our initial checking, we found the name were similar to your company’s, so we need to check with you whether your company has authorized that company to register these names. If you authorized this, we would finish the registration at once. If you did not authorize, please let us know within 7 workdays, so that we could handle this issue better. After the deadline we will unconditionally finish the registration for Derst investment, Inc.Looking forward to your prompt reply.

    Best Regards,

    Steven Yang
    Tel: +0086-28-8591-5586 || Fax: +0086-28-8591-2116
    9/F Libao building No,62 Kehua North Road,Wuhou District,Chengdu City,China
    tsnet-china.org

  • Dia says:

    I received an email from Jeff (jeff@tsnet-china.com) about a week ago. I responded and said that I do not authorize the use of my Company Name. He responded saying that Bilte Investment Inc was trying to register the following domain names and if I didn’t want that to happen then I need to register them myself. I googled Jeffs email and the company tsnet-china.com and found Dynamoo blog saying that this was a scam. I received a new email today from Jeff (posted below), I just deleted the email.

    I want to thank you for posting this because like everyone else I was supper scared. I am in the process of trademarking my company name. I even contacted them to see what the cost was to trademark internationally. They informed me that some countries honor the US trademark and China is one of them.

    ——
    Dear Dia,

    Regarding the Domain name dispute and registration case,we did not receive any of your reply until now. Concerning the mentioned Domains and Network Brand please confirm whether you need to register those names by yourselves? If need, please let us know in time, we can send an application form to you. If you think the registration of “Bilte Investment Inc” or the use of following domain names will not bring any negative effect to your company, I suggest you can give up these domain names, then we will accept “Bilte Investment Inc” application unconditionally. Further questions please contact me in time.

    Best Regards,

    Jeff Yang

    Tel: 0086-28-8591-5586 || Fax: 0086-28-8591-2116
    P Please consider the environment before you print this e-mail.

  • Oddus says:

    From alex@dingscom.org.cn

    Dear President,

    We are the department of Asian Domain Registration Service in China. I have something to confirm with you. We formally received an application on June 20, 2012 that a company which self-styled “Qing Industrial Co. Ltd” were applying to register”XXXXXXX”as their Net Brand and some domain names through our firm.
    Now we are handling this registration, and after our initial checking, we found the name were similar to your company’s, so we need to check with you whether your company has authorized that company to register these names. If you authorized this, we will finish the registration at once. If you did not authorize, please let us know within 7 workdays, so that we will handle this issue better. Out of the time limit we will unconditionally finish the registration for “Qing Industrial Co. Ltd”.Looking forward to your prompt reply.

    Best Regards,

    Alex Chen

    Senior Consultant
    Address:No.188 Huangshan Road,Shushan District,Hefei,Anhui,China
    Tel: +86 551 5223 114
    Fax:+86 551 5223 113

  • Veroni Deco says:

    This scam is still going,received my email last week,why is still going on?

  • Meghan Pauly says:

    I received an email almost exactly like this today (The registration confirmation) from Evan Xu – evan.xu@dekaceter.com
    Thanks for the info – I thought this was a scam but your article confirmed it for me.

  • Gary says:

    Surprisingly, I’d never seen such an email until today, and it looked just suspicious enough (and just authentic enough) to do some searching. Of course, a Chinese domain of the same name wouldn’t affect our business at all, but I was curious… Thank you for your post here on the subject!

    This email was as the same form as most all the others, and came from
    James Tan
    Auditing Department.
    Tel: +86 28 8778 3286
    Fax: +86 28 8757 8035
    Web: http://www.cn-nic.org

    What made it suspicious was the claim “We are the organization of trademark intellectual property protection in China.” But their name and stated purpose seemed more domain registrar than anything else. The logo image in the email was oddly fuzzy, and while their domain/”company” name is close, they don’t show up in the ICANN registrar list.

    I put this in the same category as those letters that come in the mail (not so much any more), or emails forwarded from others in the company warning that we may lose our search engine ranking (oh no!) if we don’t send them $99 right away.

  • Ming says:

    Thanks for this warning. They recently e-mailed me about this, and I am glad I found this blog.

  • LJG says:

    Dear Sirs: Aug 07th:

    Thanks for your article of warning. We just received this scam letter today. Our CEO was panicked and called be after drafting a response. Eeek. But the CEO called me before anything was sent out.

    The letter had grainy copies of the logo and signature closing of the real CNNIC business, but the address was bogus, along with the most important website address.

    The real CNNIC uses (www.cnnic.net ) or the same one with *.cn as a country-suffix.

    Our scam letter added a hypen in the middle of the organization name, and changed the suffix from NET to ORG. Lots of other little clues existed in the letter itself, if one looked closely.

    Finally, a reverse HOST look-up proved that the website and the email addy were both fake.

    Once again, thanks for your vigilance, and your waning.

    • Hey LJG,

      Great to hear this article saved you a lot of trouble. Funny thing is, my business partner did the same thing. We had registered our company domain about a year ago or so and we’re getting traction. And since he’s the admin and technical contact on for the domain, he was contacted instead of me (me being the President and CTO thus me dealing with all technology related things). Well, he replied and they tried to sell him on paying $60+ USD PER DOMAIN PER YEAR for some useless crap ass domains using our copyright …. wow, talk about bullshit.

      Thankfully, my partner contacted me first and then let it rip on those scammers. It probably wasn’t a good idea for him to reply, but at least now I can copy their conversation to you guys to see how the scammers work … and I got some amusement out of it. 🙂 I’ll post the e-mails here soon.

      Thanks LJG!

  • greg says:

    Here is my contribution :

    (Letter to the President or Brand Owner, thanks)
    Dear President,

    We are the department of Asian Domain Registration Service in China. I have something to confirm with you. We formally received an application on November 6, 2012 that a company which self-styled “Cro Industrial Co. Ltd” were applying to register”aube-champagne”as their Net Brand and some domain names through our firm.
    Now we are handling this registration, and after our initial checking, we found the name were similar to your company’s, so we need to check with you whether your company has authorized that company to register these names. If you authorized this, we will finish the registration at once. If you did not authorize, please let us know within 7 workdays, so that we will handle this issue better. Out of the time limit we will unconditionally finish the registration for “Cro Industrial Co. Ltd”.Looking forward to your prompt reply.

    Best Regards,

    Mark Wang

    Senior Auditor
    Address:No.188 Huangshan Road,Hefei 230001,Anhui,China
    Tel: (+86) 739-5266069
    Fax:(+86) 739-5266169

  • Kirsten says:

    Thanks so much for this blog putting info about this scam up! I almost fell for it, but I never send emails out without checking first. The website is “real” but like the one mentioned in the blog, there are no links – just a shell.

    Dear President,

    We are the department of Asian Domain Registration Service in China. I have something to confirm with you. We formally received an application on May 27, 2013 that a company which self-styled “PTB & TB CO” were applying to register “***-****” as their Brand Name and some domain names through our firm.

    Now we are handling this registration, and after our initial checking, we found the name were similar to your company’s, so we need to check with you whether your company has authorized that company to register these names. If you authorized this, we will finish the registration at once. If you did not authorize, please let us know within 7 workdays, so that we will handle this issue better. Out of the time limit we will unconditionally finish the registration for “PTB & TB CO”.Looking forward to your prompt reply.

    Evan Su
    Tel:+86.55163434624
    Fax:+86.55163434924
    Add:MaAnShan Road 688, Hefei, Anhui, China
    http://www.dg-network.org

  • Kirsten says:

    Thanks so much for this blog putting info about this scam up! I almost fell for it, but I never send emails out without checking first. The website is “real” but like the one mentioned in the blog, there are no links – just a shell.

    Dear President,

    We are the department of Asian Domain Registration Service in China. I have something to confirm with you. We formally received an application on May 27, 2013 that a company which self-styled “PTB & TB CO” were applying to register “***-****” as their Brand Name and some domain names through our firm.

    Now we are handling this registration, and after our initial checking, we found the name were similar to your company’s, so we need to check with you whether your company has authorized that company to register these names. If you authorized this, we will finish the registration at once. If you did not authorize, please let us know within 7 workdays, so that we will handle this issue better. Out of the time limit we will unconditionally finish the registration for “PTB & TB CO”.Looking forward to your prompt reply.

    Evan Su
    Tel:+86.55163434624
    Fax:+86.55163434924
    Add:MaAnShan Road 688, Hefei, Anhui, China
    http://www.dg-network.org

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