5 Reasons Why The Best Tool Might Not Be The Right Tool

There are many good reasons to use the best tools and resources available, though here are 5 reasons why using the best tool might not be the right tool to use given the job at hand (and your goals).

5 Reasons Why The Best Tool Might Not Be The Right Tool

Recently I helped a friend record a book reading of his three books, and I agreed to also do the video production and editing. Everything was a great learning experience, though I hit a wall when I had to actually edit the videos. Not because the videos was bad, but that I had my choice of tools to use and I didn't know which one would be the best and right one to use. Though I did finally settle on using two tools to compare them and see what I thought would work best for me going forward.

I chose to try out two well known tools:

1) Adobe Premier Pro CC

2) Apple Final Cut Pro

I chose these two to test because they are both rated extremely well and both are used throughout the (professional) video production world and both ended up giving me very good quality idea results. But they head rather different approaches to getting the job done. This is where things got confusing for me.

The first question I had to ask myself was:

“What do I really want to achieve in my video production projects?”

The answer for me was two-fold: (1) In simpler projects: I just wanted the darn thing done as quickly and easily as possible. Though when I have more complex projects I (2) wanted as much control as possible in-order to create the scenes, effects and styles I wanted.

This led me to the conclusion that there is no right answer for which tool to use, they each serve their given purpose well.

Adobe Premier Pro is without a doubt the best overall video production tool as well as the most powerful and most widely used in the industry. It's an amazing program with so many features and possibilities that it has a huge (and long) learning curve. Add Adobe After Effects (for adding more ‘movie like' effects and CG to videos/movies) and things get exponentially more complex, especially if video production isn't your specialty and you have a business to run.

I loved the power of Premier Pro, it's flexibility and I will be using it in the future for any advanced projects that I do. But …

For the majority of the video product that I do I'll be sticking to Final Cut Pro. Why? Because most of my video work is not complex at all. What I mostly create is this:

  • Introduction video of a person (usually me) speaking.
  • Overview video of something I want to sell, which means it's just me talking either in-front of a camera or doing a screencast.
  • Personal sales video. Usually will have multiple cameras, audio sources and a few extra shots of emotional appeal with voice over.
  • Product video. This is usually just a few short clips of the product strung together.
  • Video tutorial
  • Screencast

For all those above, Apple Final Cut Pro is just so much easier to work with and makes gets things done faster for me. It's all about the interface. And for those simple things I only need the simple tools easily at my disposal and Final Cut Pro gave that to me. Multiple Angle clips? No problem: I'm easily able to create a multi-angle segment and then with the click of my mouse change the angle of the video while it's playing so that it's easy to change the ‘scene'. It's actually very fun to play with.

Same with simple audio editing. Pump up the voice quality, add in some intro and outro music, maybe some background audio and that's it. Simple.

What I wouldn't use Final Cut Pro for is the next video we're putting out for our corporate page. We're almost done story boarding it, and the easy connection between Premier and After Effects make it the perfect fit for the types of things we'll be doing.

While Adobe Premier Pro will always be a superior / more-professional oriented product in my eyes and thus the ‘best' product, I'll keep on using Final Cut because it's the right fit for my needs for most things.

It really comes down to how do you define “best tool”? Best tool overall, or best tool for the specific need at the time?

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