The Current Presentation Tools I Use

Everyone once in a while I need to make a screencast, webinar or live presentation directly to a client. Having these great tools on hand really helps moves things along smoothly and for the most part without a hitch. Today I’ll tell you about how the tools I use to create presentations and to present them.

The Current Presentation Tools I Use

I had the idea for this post from Michael Hyatt’s post on his best tools for presentations, so I thought I’d share mine as well.

  1. Evernote Evernote is the ‘store anything you think of in terms of notes’ type application. I use it to store all my article, business and motivation ideas. For fun I also keep a notebook in there for my favorite beers, wines and foods.
  2. Skitch Skitch is a screenshot program. It’s very simple, it works, and it’s gorgoes. I doesn’t have as many features as my favorite Linux screenshot tool Shutter, but it does the job well enough. Michael recommends SnapZ, though when I tried it is just seemed to be a too much of an annoying not-so-well thought-out interface that I stuck with Skitch. Plus, Skitch automatically saves screenshots to my Evernote account, so it keeps things nice and organized for me. All I need is the ability to take screenshots of particular parts of the screen and sometimes add a pointy arrow, and Skitch does this well enough for me.
  3. Keynote 09 This is hands-down the easiest presentation creation tool I have ever seen. On-top of being super easy to use, it is also very pretty to look at, extremely user friendly and it creates some of the best presentations you’ll ever see. Before Keynote, I used to use either OpenOffice Present or a javascript library which worked a lot like Prezzi except free and (in my opinion) better, though more complex.
  4. SublimeText 2 Being a programmer at heart I needed something that gives me the best of the command-line world and the ease of use of Mac Software. Thus, Sublime Text. It IS a text editor, though it is also highly extensible. I currently have it setup (using several plugins and theme options) that it automagically formats and styles my text (.txt and .md) documents using the Markdown language. I use this for all my outlining and thought organization. I also use it to write in and save my articles in as a backup. For presentations, I use it to outline and to help me write the opening and closing lines.
  5. ScreenFlow Screenflow is a screen video capturing program, for recording screencasts and webinars. It’s a lot like Camtasia, though I found this to be better on the Mac than it’s competitors. It’s a bit on the expensive side, though if you make a lot of screencasts it’s worth it.
  6. Audio-Technica AT2020 USB Condenser USB Microphone The mic on a mac is good, but it’s not production quality good. So, for podcasting and recording (as well as for my business VIOP line) I got this microphone. It records very high quality audio for a very affordable price. I have this mic attached to a boom arm and a shock-mount. I also have a cheap pop filter in-front of it.

The only things I had to help me present that I currently don’t have would be:

  • Either an app on my Android phone that connects to my Mac(s) or a new iPad (I have an old one that keeps crashing) with a presentation app. OR a presentation remote.
  • A macbook air, since it’s super light, well priced and speedy and I have no need for a macbook pro. That would be great for on-the-go presentation.

What have you fellow professionals used for presentations?

Related posts

4 Score & 7 Beers Ago … The Plus & Minus Of Alcohol For Networking

‘Liquid Courage’. ‘Dutch courage’. ‘Bold Front’. ‘Liquid Bread’. Alcohol goes by many names, but at a minimum we know that any networking event will pretty much always have alcohol. Why? Because it helps lighten the mood and gets conversations going. Though is it a good idea to drink it, or not? Let’s explore both sides